Read Bad Therapy: Master Therapists Share Their Worst Failures by Jeffrey A. Kottler Online

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Bad Therapy offers a rare glimpse into the hearts and mind's of the profession's most famous authors, thinkers, and leaders when things aren't going so well. Jeffrey Kottler and Jon Carlson, who include their own therapy mishaps, interview twenty of the world's most famous practitioners who discuss their mistakes, misjudgements, and miscalculations on working with clients.Bad Therapy offers a rare glimpse into the hearts and mind's of the profession's most famous authors, thinkers, and leaders when things aren't going so well. Jeffrey Kottler and Jon Carlson, who include their own therapy mishaps, interview twenty of the world's most famous practitioners who discuss their mistakes, misjudgements, and miscalculations on working with clients. Told through narratives, the failures are related with candor to expose the human side of leading therapists. Each therapist shares with regrets, what they learned from the experience, what others can learn from their mistakes, and the benefits of speaking openly about bad therapy....

Title : Bad Therapy: Master Therapists Share Their Worst Failures
Author :
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ISBN : 9780415933230
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 201 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Bad Therapy: Master Therapists Share Their Worst Failures Reviews

  • stephanie
    2019-05-03 15:16

    good, not excellent. the case studies were brief, and while i liked the format of the book (brief discussion, presention of the case, discussion on what can learn from it), it was hard to get that involved in. which suprised me because i think this is fascinating topic - therapists DO fail sometimes, and remembering that is important. i also had the feeling most of the therapists were not telling the full truth about their most horrible mistakes. or, hell, if those are it, i want their career! not one person discussed a suicidal patient either, which i found really lacking. then again, the suicidal patient is pretty damn lacking in the literature in general, so it makes a sort of sense. but i kind f felt like one "story" with one person with at least suicidal ideation would a) show the pressure therapists are under, b) show that this really is often a matter of life and death, and c) underscore the fact that at it's very least, therapy seeks to improve lives, and fails when it maintains the status quo, or makes it worse.i think it would make an excellent bathroom book.

  • Jáchym Dvořák
    2019-05-21 16:08

    I would give this 3,5 stars if it were possible. I think the other reviews and the last chapter of the book summarized my opinion pretty accurately. I expected more depth, honesty and case studies. Instead I got plenty of 40 years old stories (!) that were mostly not even the therapist's fault, and showed no real mistakes per se. A few really good insights and case studies, plenty of mediocre ones and a few literally useless ones. At least I know which therapists to look up and read on, and which I better forget I got to know. Also, one minor issue I had with this book - there was not a single psychoanalytic case, even though according to statistics, it's among the 3 most frequently used therapeutic approaches.

  • Genna
    2019-05-11 19:18

    Helpful but so so dry.

  • Rita
    2019-04-22 15:00

    There's so much to be learned from failure when people are brave enough to share it.

  • Hawk
    2019-05-07 23:21

    I was going to only give this book 3 stars, up until I read the very last chapter. It was in reading the last chapter that I realized that most of the frustrations I was experiencing with this book were the same ones the authors felt in trying to tackle this project. I wanted more from the contributors. I wanted more contributors. I wanted more in-depth discussion and case examples. I wanted to hear more mistakes and failures. I wanted more transparency. I wanted it to be longer. And then I didn't want it to end.That being said, knowing that the authors struggled with the same issues, I was able to see things from both sides of this project. There were times when I marveled at how closely these therapists held many of my own ideas about the therapy process and how well the authors did at drawing more out of the contributors. Sometimes I was annoyed at the therapists that seemed so tight-lipped, preachy, or acted as if they could do no wrong. Then I saw how frustrating and challenging it might be for the authors, and how scary of an experience it would be as a therapist, especially one that is still practicing. This wasn't just a series of case studies. It was a humanizing experience. It allowed me to understand more about the personalities and backgrounds of different master therapists, to really see them as people, both in what and how much they disclosed and in how much we can gauge that they are withholding.I think this would be a great book for anyone in the counseling and therapy field, no matter where they are in their practice. I could see this being a useful tool for beginning therapists that need to bolster their confidence level. I could see a long-time therapist finding this as a refreshing course to reflect upon and continue growing, maybe in new directions. And I could see myself coming back to this text over the years as a reminder and to help me gauge how well I am understanding my own experiences and growth as a therapist.

  • Deb
    2019-04-22 19:21

    *We all make mistakes*A series of short chapters where master therapists share their goofs, this book can offer some relief to "real life" therapists. Predictably, a main theme of the book was it's not about the mistakes, but about what you can learn from them. I felt that this book did not match up to the captivating and enthralling content and style of other three similar books by Kottler and Carlson. Perhaps the reason for the dryer nature of this book was (as Kottler and Carlson also pointed out) that it was difficult for the therapists interviewed to speak candidly about their perceived therapeutic failures. As a result, the therapists in these stories seemed to be much more detached and expert-like than in the other books where they seemed human, genuine, and real. But, I suppose this shows that even therapists struggle with self-acceptance when confronting personal issues. (Perhaps that's the real message of this book!) :)

  • Noreen
    2019-05-19 22:01

    It's interesting to read therapists' own words as they grapple with the concept of telling accounts about their failures. The overall message is that each one of them learned something, which in most cases is a success.

  • Kristen
    2019-04-23 15:13

    Overall I thought the book was preachy and superficial, but I think it was a good reminder of how we can get overcome with the pathology of our clients.

  • Katie
    2019-04-22 18:58

    The intention behind this book was great. Really helpful.

  • Charlotte
    2019-05-07 16:18

    It makes you realise how important words are and how easy a relation can be destroyed.

  • sarah
    2019-05-11 19:17

    funny