Read Salad Anniversary by Machi Tawara Online

salad-anniversary

In her collection of brief poems, Tawara explores the fleeting emotions and momentary experiences that comprise modern life and love....

Title : Salad Anniversary
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780870119200
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 204 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Salad Anniversary Reviews

  • Sue
    2019-04-15 18:30

    Salad Anniversary, first published in 1987 in Japan to tremendous following, is now being published By Pushkin Press and will now be available for an American audience. It is comprised of Tawara's tanka poetry on a variety of subjects, most very personal insights into modern life and love. This was a new, personal approach when it first appeared and highly popular and successful.There is an afterward (which I recommend reading prior to the poetry) which explains tanka poetry. I found it helped to explain some issues I had had with my early reading in the book. As I read, I found that these deceptively simple poems became more and more appealing in their simplicity and beauty.Through the falling rain, a shower of shivering "S" sounds, I watch your umbrella recede Your disappearing figure, a little too cool-- It's always the man who sets off on a journey* (loc 193, from Salad Anniversary)There are small moments that struck me. From My Bisymmetrical Self:the ordinariness of home is what I like best From mother-and-daughter we turn into a pair of women (loc 239)*And lastly, from Jazz Concert:Photographer snapping away at the stage---he, too, master of his instrument Like a hit man he peers into his camera wrapped in layers of blue smoky air ..... On the stage, tangled cords lie sprawled like bars of melted music fallen off the page. (loc 261)*It did take me a little reading to become comfortable with the format and to slow down, settle in to the words, not hurry though. When I did that, I enjoyed this book and plan to read it again.Any issues of layout are mine.Recommended for those who enjoy poetry.A copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review.

  • Akylina
    2019-04-16 16:41

    'Salad Anniversary' is a marvelous collection of poetry. Machi Tawara has managed to elevate a traditional poetic form to an entire new level, incorporating everyday matters and feelings into it in the most successful way possible. Anyone who has experienced love, its initial excitement and its eventual loss will find themselves nodding in silent agreement to the feelings and situations described. I loved how each poem was like a short story by itself, but they all connected with each other somehow, as the personal element was evident in most of them. Loneliness and emptiness are prevalent in all the poems, and the collection leaves you off with the bittersweet feeling of loss. However, not all the poems are about love. Machi Tawara also explores themes such as family, her experience as a school teacher, travelling and so on. Overall, it is a poetry collection that I treasure immensely now, as the tenderness and despair of the poems have hit home for me. I loved every bit of this book and I can completely understand why it has gained this enormous recognition in Japan.A copy was gently provided to me by the publisher via NetGalley.

  • Kimbofo
    2019-04-15 14:48

    Salad Anniversary was first published in 1987 and within the first six months it had sold 2.5 million copies in Japan alone. According to the press release that came with this newly reprinted edition, it has now sold 9 million copies worldwide. How’s that for an impressive figure?And I can see why it’s so popular: these poems (there’s 15 in total) slip down like hot chocolate. They’re all rather sweet and easy to read, brimming with life, energy and wit, yet there’s something rather soothing about them, too. That’s probably because of the way they are structured, for these poems are technically called “Tanka”, an ancient Japanese form of poetry in which each poem traditionally comprises 31 syllables arranged over five lines in a 5-7-5-7-7 pattern.However, in the Afterword, the translator explains that not all of the poems follow the strict 5-7-5-7-7 format and that they are almost always written in a single line in Japanese. In this English translation most of the poems are structured over three lines and read more like Haiku (17 syllables over three lines following a 5-7-5 pattern). But this is all by the by: you don’t read this collection to quibble over syllable counts and the number of lines; you read it to be transported into another world.And what a world Tawara creates. There are many recurring themes, often revolving around romantic love, cooking, travel and the weather, but the main overriding theme is the ordinariness in our day-to-day lives. The irony is that she writes about it in a far from ordinary way.To read my review in full, please visit my blog.

  • Laau
    2019-03-22 14:28

    me he vuelto a leer los poemas que guardé como favoritos y le cambio las 4 estrellitas a un 5. os animo a leerlo, que es muy cortito y muy ameno, os lo acabáis en nada. la edición que hay en españa es bastante fea, eso sí es cierto, pero la traducción de kayoko takagi es increíblemente fiel. os dejo por aquí mis favoritos para que os entre en gusanillo:72. "Nací para correr"-dices. Para ti, que no tienes pueblo adonde volver,quiero ser tu mar77. Poemas de amor antiguosme afectan todos esta noche.Pongo un círculo en todos ellos87. Como la nieve cayendodesde el pueblo donde vive mi madre,soledad en Tokio114. Tienes tus sábados, lo sé.Los míos se pasanfingiendo no darme cuenta132. ¡Sal, pálido sol!Este sentimiento de otoñode perderte199. Recordando tu chistese me escapa la risaen mitad de la muchedumbre202. Si mañana no va a llegar nuncate lo contaré todoantes de quedarme dormida281. En mi mesael aroma de café tan rico¡Cómo puedo pensar en vivirsólo de amor!284. Mi perfil dentro de un año¿a qué mirará?¿a quién mirará?285. Me acuerdo de tus manos,tu espalda, tu respiración,tus calcetines blancosdejados donde te los quitaste287. De pie en la salida del metrome da un vuelco el corazón,no hay nadie esperándome299. Tomo mi corazón herido,lo lanzo con todas mis fuerzas,¡que el cielo de mañana esté despejado!306. Dejando en el andén solomi deseo de seguir contigo hasta mañanatomo el último tren321. El día en el que me voymi padre no murmura"así que te vas!sino "así que nos dejas"408. Delicadamenteflorece el cosmosbajo la luz morada y transparente del solsin saber nada del pasado otoño

  • erin
    2019-03-24 12:19

    This is a gem of contemporary haiku and tanka. It reads like a collection of short stories, almost. If you've lived in Japan particularly, you'll enjoy the memories of vivid sights, smells, sounds, and feelings that are brought to life by a few evocative words. But I'd say any female who has ever thought herself in love will connect with Ms. Machi-chan's imagery. And any lover of small things will appreciate her sensibility...

  • Nafiza
    2019-03-31 10:43

    3.5 There has been a LOT lost in translation unfortunately but glimmers still remain.

  • Parrish Lantern
    2019-04-21 10:29

    The fact that "Salad Anniversary" sold over two point five million copies in Japan on its initial publication in 1987, would raise the eyebrow of any lover of poetry, add to this that it also created a phenomenon comparable to writers such as Banana Yoshimoto or Haruki Murakami, in the process turning a shy & retiring school teacher into a celebrity, hosting shows both on TV & Radio that promoted poetry. Now write into this tale that it was written in a format (Tanka) that can trace it's roots to the eighth century (Waka) and that it also received critical acclaim, winning 32nd Kadokawa Tanka Prize and the 32nd Modern Japanese Poets Association Award, Got your attention! – Good.Tanka* (短歌 "short poem") is a genre of classical Japanese poetry,originally, in the time of the Man'yōshū (latter half of the eighth century AD), the term Tanka was used to distinguish "short poems" from the longer chōka, or long poems (長歌). In the ninth and tenth centuries the short poem became the dominant form of poetry in Japan, and the originally general word Waka became the standard name for this form. Japanese poet and critic Masaoka Shiki** revived the term Tanka in the early twentieth century for his statement that "waka should be renewed and modernized" with the Man'yōshū (Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves) as the reference point. After the 2nd world war it fell out of favour again, considered out of date, although this changed during the late 1980s after it was explored and revived by contemporary poets such as Machi TawaraJazz concertThe guitarist's mouth,Half open as he plays –Jazz, a downpour of sound and rhythm.The drum beats on, never knowing of theStaves pounding rhythmically into my fleshStanding on the amplifierWhere horizontal andVertical sound waves converge –a can of beerBy the end of the musicians second numberI am drenched in notes.The above is part of a poem with the title Jazz Concert, and that is my dilemma in writing about this book, for example the opening section "August Morning" is a fifty poem sequence and it was this that got her the original attention and that received the 32nd Kadokawa Tanka Prize, also these poems would originally have been written as a single vertical line, three to a page. This means that what appears here on my post, is what I've chosen to place, arbitrarily ending the sequence at a place I've deemed fitting. All I can state is that these poems work as a whole and read like a diary and, like a diary they are full of emotion, the writing comes off the page with an exuberance, a sparkle and an honesty that draws you in, lines like:Like getting up to leave a hamburger place –that's how I'll leavethat manresonate and show how by combining a classical, almost derided format, with modern language and imagery, Machi Tawara woke up a nation to its own poetic history and in the process reinvigorated it. What is also amazing, is the response she received back from her readers. Inspired by her words, by her poetry - they sent her thousands of letters and in these letters were well over 200,000 tanka composed by her fans in acknowledgement to how she had affected them. She went on to choose 1,500, which were published in book form - the oldest contributor was a 91 year old man and the youngest an 11 year old girl. The Day I left for TokyoMother looked older by all the years ofseparation ahead

  • Kevin Dio
    2019-03-28 18:45

    Une lecture qui change et qui est tellement agréable ! C’est frais, c’est touchant, c’est mignon, et ça donne un coup de jeune au tanka, une forme de poésie trop peu connue par chez nous, sans pour autant la dénaturer. Un recueil à picorer sans modération.Avis complet : https://comaujapon.wordpress.com/2017...

  • Alan Summers
    2019-04-06 14:41

    Official Web Site of Tawara Machi, Japanese tanka poet:http://www.gtpweb.net/twr/indexe.htmThe superior translation is by Jack Stamm who used the familiar five line form of tanka, rather than a confusing three line format by Juliet Winters.Salad Anniversary by Machi Tawara translated by Jack Stamm. Published in Tokyo, 1987. Paper bound, 4.5 x 6 inches, kanji, and English. Machi Tawara's book, which has sold around 2.5 million copies. This is an excellent book of short love poems, almost like a verse novel, and Machi Tawara cleverly fuses traditional tanka form with contemporary love lives!

  • Evanille
    2019-03-23 12:20

    Me encantaría aprender japonés para leer estos poemas en su idioma original. Son muy lindos, pero siento que los poemas deben perder mucha emoción al traducirlo a otro idioma, en este caso, al inglés.

  • J
    2019-03-29 11:25

    Small poetic envelopes stuffed with moments, when opened, showing the wonderful rich and deep world of daily life. Perfect gifts, drawn from life. Splendid.

  • Laura
    2019-04-06 11:38

    The themes in this collection of tanka poetry are ordinary, accessible, light. Tawara writes about pop music and cooking, meandering through the city, street vendors, baseball, breakups, sharing meals, train rides. These poems are not lofty--they're about the ups and downs of relationships and the mundane things that comprise daily life. There's self-reflection and a certain seriousness in her tone, but she's also playful, joyful, and sometimes silly.The tanka are grouped in several longer sequences. The themes in some were easy to pick out--meeting a new lover, heartbreak, visiting a childhood home. In other sequences, the overall meaning felt a bit more abstract.I loved so many of these poems--short bursts of beauty, a few lines that perfectly capture a moment or a feeling. But I also felt as if they passed through me and didn't leave much of a mark. The whole book felt ephemeral. I read only a few poems each day, wanting to let them sink in, but I found that each time I picked up the book, I couldn't remember what I had read the day before. Even when an image or an idea particularly moved me, it didn't stay with me. While none of these poems hit me deep in the gut, perhaps they weren't meant to. I can only interperate Tawara's intentions though her words, which, of course, I'm reading through the lens of a translator--but there was a freshness to these poems that didn't invite deep analysis or long contemplation. They felt more like little bursts--some brighter than others--meant to be savored in the moment and then released. 

  • Anita
    2019-03-25 13:36

    i possess neither the knowledge nor the correct words to talk about why this book is revolutionary to the form of Japanese tanka, but with lines like thisFat oval sun can’t bear the burden of its own weightIn a backstreet my eyes meet the stare of a white cat— this corner of old Tokyo, a crack in timeit's pretty Nice anyways

  • Ian Wood
    2019-04-07 16:48

    This is the complete review as it appears at my blog dedicated to reading, writing (no 'rithmatic!), movies, & TV. Blog reviews often contain links which are not reproduced here, nor will updates or modifications to the blog review be replicated here. Graphic and children's reviews on the blog typically feature two or three images from the book's interior, which are not reproduced here.Note that I don't really do stars. To me a book is either worth reading or it isn't. I can't rate it three-fifths worth reading! The only reason I've relented and started putting stars up there is to credit the good ones, which were being unfairly uncredited. So, all you'll ever see from me is a five-star or a one-star (since no stars isn't a rating, unfortunately).I rated this book WARTY!Machi Tawara is a young Japanese poet who single-handedy revived the ancient tanka style of poetry in Japan, but for me it just tanked. The poetry left me completely flat. It was nothing uplifting or edifying. It wasn't educational or moving. All it consists of is Tawara pining over a lost love - which she personally never had to begin with - or talking about her everyday activities which frankly, was boring.For this she became a superstar poet in Japan, selling some two to three million copies of the book. I guess you had to be there. What appeals to the Japanese isn't necessarily what appeals to we westerners, nor vice-versa, and while I am sure that Juliet Winters Carpenter gave the translation her best shot, the fact is that you can't translate Japanese to English and have the idea behind Tanka remain true. If you did, the English version would not be in a series of triplets, as it appears in the iPad translation, or in an apparently random mix of couplets and others as it is in the kindle, but printed vertically down the page, which in English would be a tough read. Clearly no thought whatsoever has been expended on the ebook versions.Salad Anniversary begins with two blank pages in the iPad version, and the title with a capital S towards the end of Anniversary in the Kindle version. This tells me that as little thought went into the ebook as went into the print version. Given the rise of ebooks the publisher might want to give some thought to how they offer their wares.Here's the list of poem titles: August Morning Baseball Game Morning Necktie I Am the Wind Summertime Ship Wake-up Call Hashimoto High School Pretending to Wait for Someone Salad Anniversary Twilight Alley My Bisymmetrical Self So, Good Luck Jazz Concert Backstreet Cat Always AmericanYou can see from this alone that there's nothing Earth-shattering on offer, but this would have been fine had what was offered actually delivered something of value. For me, it didn't. Here are some short unconnected samples so you can judge a little bit, at least, for yourself. Note that these are taken out of context, but I saw very little flowing from one triplet to the next anyway. On Kujukuri Beach taking picture after picture I may only throw away Sunday morning in sandals, we set off together to shop for bread and beer I boil three chestnuts to make an autumn for one- remembering the far-off sea, and you Buy myself a pair of slippers yellow as spring flowers now that I love hereThere are three problems. First of all, the poetry doesn't speak or call out to me. Instead, it whines with self pity. I kept wondering if the author rent her clothing or wore sackcloth and put ashes in her hair before she sat down to write it. Second, it's impossible, as I mentioned earlier, to properly represent the poetry in English in the way it would appear in Japanese. Third, you cannot duplicate the cadence adequately in English and still maintain the wording or meaning which the original author intended.I have to wonder if the choice to migrate this to English was truly done with an honest desire to share some potentially interesting Asian poetry with the west, or if it was simply done because the author scored a hit in Japan and there was potentially money to be made in the west? Either way I can't recommend this.

  • Artur
    2019-04-14 13:35

    I love everything about this collection: the union of everyday images with depth of emotion, the lightness of the poems, the touch of bittersweetness.

  • Parrish Lantern
    2019-04-11 11:44

    The fact that "Salad Anniversary" sold over two point five million copies in Japan on its initial publication in 1987, would raise the eyebrow of any lover of poetry, add to this that it also created a phenomenon comparable to writers such as Banana Yoshimoto or Haruki Murakami, in the process turning a shy & retiring school teacher into a celebrity, hosting shows both on TV & Radio that promoted poetry. Now write into this tale that it was written in a format (Tanka) that can trace it's roots to the eighth century (Waka) and that it also received critical acclaim, winning 32nd Kadokawa Tanka Prize and the 32nd Modern Japanese Poets Association Award, Got your attention! – Good.Tanka* (短歌 "short poem") is a genre of classical Japanese poetry,originally, in the time of the Man'yōshū (latter half of the eighth century AD), the term Tanka was used to distinguish "short poems" from the longer chōka, or long poems (長歌). In the ninth and tenth centuries the short poem became the dominant form of poetry in Japan, and the originally general word Waka became the standard name for this form. Japanese poet and critic Masaoka Shiki** revived the term Tanka in the early twentieth century for his statement that "waka should be renewed and modernized" with the Man'yōshū (Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves) as the reference point. After the 2nd world war it fell out of favour again, considered out of date, although this changed during the late 1980s after it was explored and revived by contemporary poets such as Machi TawaraJazz concertThe guitarist's mouth,Half open as he plays –Jazz, a downpour of sound and rhythm.The drum beats on, never knowing of theStaves pounding rhythmically into my fleshStanding on the amplifierWhere horizontal andVertical sound waves converge –a can of beerBy the end of the musicians second numberI am drenched in notes.The above is part of a poem with the title Jazz Concert, and that is my dilemma in writing about this book, for example the opening section "August Morning" is a fifty poem sequence and it was this that got her the original attention and that received the 32nd Kadokawa Tanka Prize, also these poems would originally have been written as a single vertical line, three to a page. This means that what appears here on my post, is what I've chosen to place, arbitrarily ending the sequence at a place I've deemed fitting. All I can state is that these poems work as a whole and read like a diary and, like a diary they are full of emotion, the writing comes off the page with an exuberance, a sparkle and an honesty that draws you in, lines like:Like getting up to leave a hamburger place –that's how I'll leavethat manresonate and show how by combining a classical, almost derided format, with modern language and imagery, Machi Tawara woke up a nation to its own poetic history and in the process reinvigorated it. What is also amazing, is the response she received back from her readers. Inspired by her words, by her poetry - they sent her thousands of letters and in these letters were well over 200,000 tanka composed by her fans in acknowledgement to how she had affected them. She went on to choose 1,500, which were published in book form - the oldest contributor was a 91 year old man and the youngest an 11 year old girl. The Day I left for TokyoMother looked older by all the years ofseparation ahead

  • Katie Anne
    2019-03-31 11:47

    A beautiful and simple book of poetry, Tawara shows how powerful simple poetry can be. Deceptively simple, her tankas pack a bittersweet punch.Must read if you love-romance-haikus-details-japanese culturein so many ways, her poetry is the detail and beauty like Sofia Coppola's films.

  • Margaryta
    2019-04-14 10:26

    Japanese culture is beautiful and complex, and its poetry is practically nothing compared to the western idea of the subject. Haikus are a personal love of mine, and the process of poetry writing and the whole ceremony with ink and drawing the characters is riveting. However I’ve never read a book of translated Japanese poetry, so “Salad Anniversary” felt like a perfect introduction to the subject. I had one strong conviction after finishing this book: Japanese doesn’t translate well into English. This was obvious from the structure of all the poems, as in some places the stanzas would be four lines instead of the usual three, whereas in Japanese the writing would be vertical (from what I vaguely remember of Japanese poetry, at least), so the form would complement the words. Besides the structure itself however I found that some places throughout the poems lost their impact in the process of translation. This book is difficult to review because of the technical aspect of the writing, which can probably be overlooked by people who are looking specifically only the meaning of the words without focusing too much on the structure or the flow of the writing. Which brings me to another conclusion I made: Japanese poetry truly isn’t for everyone, and Tawara was a little too much for me. After reading classical and contemporary western poetry, the simplicity and repetitive nature of Tawara’s poems began to wear me down a tad. I think it’s due to the difference in cultural mentality, and really depends on the reader, their patience and understanding with the topic as well as the flexibility they have with approaching it. From my simple, initial reaction, I can say I didn’t particularly like this poetry collection. It had some good images here and there, but I struggled with the flow of it, a problem that I think is due to the structure of poetry in Japanese vs English. Another factor is my lack of familiarity with the tanka, which has definitely jaded my ability to appreciate the writing. I’m torn with the verdict for this one so I’ll say that it’s my own fault as a reader for not being able to appreciate the collection properly. I wasn’t gripped by the subject matter, the approach, or the presentation. It was only brief moments of serenity and calm imagery that kept me floating through the poems and providing some colour to an otherwise not particularly gripping collection.

  • Arja Salafranca
    2019-04-08 12:37

    Machi Tawara's first book of fifteen poems, Salad Anniversary was first published in 1987 in Japan where, remarkably for a poetry book, it sold over two million copies. In this slim, but delightful volume, she combines the classical ‘tanka’ Japanese form of short poetry, consisting of 30 tone syllables in a 5-7-5-7-7 pattern) to document a doomed love affair. The poetry is sensuously beautiful, yet pared down, the language deceptively simple, yet talking in unsentimental tones about the beginning and the ending of love. In August Morning the narrator is with her lover: “You and I on a night beach face to face in silence – a sparkler softy sputters. /Breaking your hesitation, I watch you hunt for words to break the silence/Your left hand/exploring my fingers one by one – maybe this is love.” Or is it? Later on in the same poem, the narrator says simply: “Now that I wait for you no more, sunny Saturdays and rainy Tuesdays are all the same to me.” Longing suffuses these poems, moments are briefly captured as in the title poem Salad Anniversary: “Folding towels,/I wrap the smell of the sun – /perhaps one day I too shall be a mother.”The love affair continues in Baseball Game, but the signs are there: “You have your future, I mine, and so we take no snapshots”, and later in the same poem, “Cooking an omelette/flavoured with tears/of coming morning and farewell.” This achingly beautiful set of poems is accompanied by an afterward by the translator Juliet Winters Carpenter. Highly recommended.

  • Rebekah Crain
    2019-04-20 11:40

    This collection of translated Japanese poetry was short, but sweet. Touching on dreams of the heart, love found and lost, families, and nature this collection has a little something for everyone. If I am honest, I love poetry but don't understand fully how it received the incredibly overwhelming positive following and became such a best seller in its native tongue in Japan. I don't mean to suggest it isn't good, because there were certainly some strong feelings and ideas coming through the verses. It just wasn't my all time favorite. What an amazing accomplishment for the author though to have her work traverse the boundaries of her nation and still all these many years later continue to be a publication sensation. In the words of the author "to live is to create poetry, to create poetry is to live.”What a beautiful way to summarize life. Thank you, NetGalley, for the opportunity to review this book.

  • Alisa Wilhelm
    2019-04-02 16:45

    Tawara writes about the problems of modern love (from an introvert’s perspective, for sure), daily life, family relationships, and self-doubts. Even though she’s Japanese, and didn’t have to deal with eHarmony or Tindr when she was writing it, it’s super easy to nod along, smile ruefully because it’s true, and see yourself in her words.This is a perfect read if you want to enjoy the structure of poetry, would like something that our references our contemporary condition, and is light yet thoughtful.Full review on Papercuttts.

  • Iori Kawasaki
    2019-04-01 18:37

    This book report is for Mat's class(Tue 4 period)Title:Salad AnniversaryPublisher: IBC publicreading time:60minSeven words Summary: daily,tanka,poem,love,sad,friend,loverDiscussion Question 1:Have you ever read this book in Japanese?My Answer: Yes, I hav read this book in Japanese. I found the difference between in Japanese and in English. It is difficult to express Japanese Haiku in English.Discussion Question 2: Can you explain what is haiku?My answer: Haiku is a three-line poem with seventeen syllables in the pattern of 5-7-5. Including a seasonal word is an important aspect of haiku.

  • Sheryl
    2019-04-15 17:32

    Snippets of beautifully stringed verses. However, how they are stringed to form one coherent poem did not seem to work too well for me. I was for the most part confused at what was happening and what the author wanted to express. It did not feel too solid for me but there were definitely gems of verses that were heartwarming and real.Note: This E-Book is free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Marjorie
    2019-03-21 13:32

    Given To Me For An Honest ReviewSalad Anniversary by Machi Tawara is a very easy to read book of poetry. It contains 15 poems that are full of life, energy and wit. The recurring themes around the poems are romantic love, cooking, travel and the weather. I loved reading these poems. I recommend this book to everyone. I look for more from Machi Tawara.

  • tyto
    2019-04-05 13:26

    I received this from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This collection of modern twists on the traditional tanka form focuses on love and life, in a way that is easy to relate to. It still feels modern, even though it was written in 1989. However, something was lost in the translation for me - wish I could read it in the original Japanese!

  • James
    2019-04-19 16:31

    A strong collection of love poems that combines the classical tanka form with the theme of contemporary romance. The poems focus on remembrances and young love filled with images that remain in the reader's mind long after reading. A lovely collection. [I received an advanced e-galley of this book through Netgalley. The book is due to be published June 9, 2015.]

  • Dmitry Demidov
    2019-04-06 15:24

    На русском это, конечно, довольно странное чтение. Хотя если вдумываться в каждую строчку, смаковать их, то можно довольно много времени провести за этой книгой. Меня же все время куда-то уносило, переворачивал страницы и понимал, что последние несколько стихов просто пропустил. Попробую когда-нибудь на японском перечитать.

  • GONZA
    2019-03-23 10:26

    Very beautiful poetry from Japan, able to describe relationships without using a lot of words.Poesie molto belle dal Giappone, capaci di descrivere le relazioni senza usare tante parole.THANKS TO NETGALLEY AND PUSHKIN PRESS FOR THE PREVIEW!

  • Brunhilda
    2019-04-21 16:29

    Me encantaría aprender japonés para leer estos poemas en su idioma original. Son muy lindos, pero siento que los poemas deben perder mucha emoción al traducirlo a otro idioma, en este caso, al inglés.

  • Leigh Forsstrom
    2019-04-17 17:44

    Poetry in translation, especially a rigid form like tanka, is a little weird. Still, I was transported.