Read leg over leg volume two by Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq أحمد فارس الشدياق Humphrey Davies Online

leg-over-leg-volume-two

Volume two: Leg Over Leg Or, the Turtle in the Tree Concerning the Fariyaq: What Manner of Creature Might He Be.Leg over Leg recounts the life, from birth to middle age, of the Fariyaq, alter ego of Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, a pivotal figure in the intellectual and literary history of the modern Arab world. The always edifying and often hilarious adventures of the Fariyaq, aVolume two: Leg Over Leg Or, the Turtle in the Tree Concerning the Fariyaq: What Manner of Creature Might He Be.Leg over Leg recounts the life, from birth to middle age, of the Fariyaq, alter ego of Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, a pivotal figure in the intellectual and literary history of the modern Arab world. The always edifying and often hilarious adventures of the Fariyaq, as he moves from his native Lebanon to Egypt, Malta, Tunis, England and France, provide the author with grist for wide-ranging discussions of the intellectual and social issues of his time, including the ignorance and corruption of the Lebanese religious and secular establishments, freedom of conscience, women s rights, sexual relationships between men and women, the manners and customs of Europeans and Middle Easterners, and the differences between contemporary European and Arabic literatures. Al-Shidyaq also celebrates the genius and beauty of the classical Arabic language.Akin to Sterne and Rabelais in his satirical outlook and technical inventiveness, al-Shidyaq produced inLeg Over Lega work that is unique and unclassifiable. It was initially widely condemned for its attacks on authority, its religious skepticism, and its obscenity, and later editions were often abridged. This is the first English translation of the work and reproduces the original Arabic text, published under the author s supervision in 1855."Humphrey Davies is an award-winning translator of Arabic literature from the Ottoman period to the present. Writers he has translated include Elias Khoury, Naguib Mahfouz, Alaa Al Aswany, Bahaa Taher, Mourid Barghouti, Muhammad Mustagab, Gamal al-Ghitani, Hamdy el-Gazzar, Khaled Al-Berry, and Ahmed Alaidy, as well as Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq and Yusuf al-Shirbini for the Library of Arabic Literature. He has also authored, with Madiha Doss, an anthology of writings in Egyptian colloquial Arabic. He lives in Cairo....

Title : leg over leg volume two
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 20111318
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 464 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

leg over leg volume two Reviews

  • Ronald Morton
    2018-11-17 16:36

    I have cast from me, thank God, Book One, and relieved my pate of its burden. I scarcely believed I’d ever get to the second book, the first made me feel so dizzy, especially when I set out upon the Waves to pay the Fariyaq a respectful and honorable farewell. Anyway, I’m under no obligation to follow him wherever he goes, and for a while, after he reached Alexandria and swallowed the pebbles off its ground, my pen just sat there smacking its lips, my inkwell closed.I'll note up front that this review will likely be quite a bit shorter than the first, because the author is hitting on a lot of the same notes as he does in the first volume. However I did want to take a moment to discuss the two different types of lists that the author favors when showing off his inventory of "rare words". As demonstrated through my first review of the first volume, at times the author will provide an accounting of a certain set of words in large-scale block paragraph form. But (and this is present in the first volume, but much more prevelant here in the second) he will dedicate chapters to an almost glossary-type layout where he lists the rare words more in a dictionary format. My guess, and it's only a guess, is that he utilizes the dictionary type of format when the words that he is showing off are considerably rarer than those used in the block paragraph format. This book has a few chapters that are in the glossary format - a quick aside, these chapters are frequently very funny - and they actually take up a large amount of this volume. For example there are three chapters (of 20) in the middle of the book the take up roughly 170 of the 400 pages of this book, one of which is this:The other two are almost entirely glossary. (I won't spoil it, but that Chapter right there is a really funny joke).Also, I will note that this book goes a bit deeper into the humorous aspect of language and it possibility for ribald error: there is a long section dedicated to a priest who cannot properly pronounce Arabic, frequently leading to his making outlandish and obscene statements, and there is another long section dedicated to errors is translation - typically with very minuscule mistakes - leading to, again, outlandish and obscene statements. These sections appear to be almost entirely pun-based in the original Arabic, but unfortunately those puns are lost in translation; thankfully the humor is on full display, and these are just other places where I gained deeper respect both for what the author was doing, and for how the translator solved for the translation issues.The book also remains scholarly at the same time, with a chapter dedicated to the nuance of language as it applies to Arabic poetry, especially in an elevated verse form. Shockingly, the elevated poetry turns quite ribald.God I love this book.

  • Stephen Weinstock
    2018-12-15 19:38

    I was exciting that there was an Arabic author from the 19th Century who was a kind of experimental novelist. It was a fun ride, an interesting journey into another culture, but it was too repetitive and abstruse to compel me to the next volumes.

  • Maia
    2018-12-05 22:28

    yeah, good. Preferred volume one over all, due to the huge lists of words - or was that the end of volume one? they do end, but not for a year or two haha