Read The Real Story of Stone Soup by Ying Chang Compestine Stéphane Jorisch Online

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A stingy fisherman always makes his three young helpers do all his work. One day he scolds the “lazy boys” for forgetting to provide lunch. “Don’t worry,” they say. “We can make stone soup.” The boys dig a hole and fill it with water and “flavored” stones. They trick the fisherman into making bowls and chopsticks, and fetching salt and sesame oil. While he’s busy, they stiA stingy fisherman always makes his three young helpers do all his work. One day he scolds the “lazy boys” for forgetting to provide lunch. “Don’t worry,” they say. “We can make stone soup.” The boys dig a hole and fill it with water and “flavored” stones. They trick the fisherman into making bowls and chopsticks, and fetching salt and sesame oil. While he’s busy, they stir in bird eggs, add wild vegetables, and slip fish into the soup. By the time the old man returns, they have a feast fit for a king. To this day, “Egg Drop Stone Soup” is a traditional dish in southeast China. A recipe is included....

Title : The Real Story of Stone Soup
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780525474937
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 32 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Real Story of Stone Soup Reviews

  • Eve
    2019-03-17 02:43

    I loved this Chinese version of the stone soup folktale, which the author was inspired to write when visiting the Xi Shuang Ban Na region of China. This version is an old recipe that is cooked in the ground! I can’t wait to try the recipe detailed at the end of the book.

  • Cheryl
    2019-02-16 00:38

    One of my favorite tales, so I may be biased towards retellings. This is interesting as it explicitly presumes the reader knows the basic version, with soldier and villagers. I do appreciate the technique of the disconnect between narration & illustration: the boss man claims to work hard, but we can see he is really lazy, etc. (Do you remember what that technique is called? And when can children generally begin to understand it? Please comment.)The illustrations are lively. The text is long enough to interest the older children who are most likely to appreciate the sophistication of the plot. And apparently there are other stories about these clever Chang brothers; I'll have to look for them.

  • Emily Burke
    2019-02-17 00:48

    The Real Story of Stone Soup is a folktale of how egg drop soup came about. It is the story about brothers that trick a man into thinking they have made soup with just rocks and water. They made the man make bowls and chopsticks to distract him while they added actual ingredients into a soup. This book is based off of the tale that has been told in southeast China for years. The pictures were very inviting and the writing was fun and playful. This book was very fun to read and I think that it would be great to have in a classroom. I like that this book even includes a recipe for "stone soup" (which is really just egg drop soup.) It was interesting to read about a tale that has been told by so many people and that he's been passed on through many generations. The Real Story of Stone Soup was a fun read!

  • Krista the Krazy Kataloguer
    2019-02-20 03:50

    Those Chang boys invented everything, according to author Compestine! They invented the kite, noodles, chopsticks, paper, and now, stone soup. The story is cleverly narrated by the lazy fisherman, and the difference between what he says and what the pictures show is really happening adds humor to the tale. I'm not sure, however, that it would be entirely clear to a young reader that the boys were playing a trick on the fisherman with the stones--making him believe that they produced the ingredients. There's a recipe in the back for the soup, which even includes the addition of stones! Pair this with Marcia Brown's classic rendering or some of the other versions for compare and contrast.

  • Natalie
    2019-03-09 03:56

    Fractured FairytaleIn this version of the tale, a chinese fisherman claims to be the original preparer of the stone soup. He boasts about hiring three stupid brothers to help him on his boat. Ultimately we see that the three brothers are able to feed them all by talking to stones and finding which magical stones will turn to fish and vegetables before their eyes.

  • Heidi-Marie
    2019-02-18 02:40

    I enjoyed this story. I liked the pictures just fine. It would take a careful observer (in the young audience) to notice what the 3 Changs are doing with the soup while the pompous, lazy fisherman is distracted by other task. I'm not sure if even the Book Time audience would catch on to the fact that the Chang brothers are truly the smart ones and not "sly" and "disrepectful" as the narrator fisherman keeps describing them. Still, a good one to consider for actually reading.

  • Kimberly
    2019-02-23 02:59

    Liked this one but didn't love it. I sat in while a third grade teacher read it to her class and the silliness is subtle enough that a lot of them didn't get it until they got a closer look at the pictures. The fisherman and his "lazy" nephews do provide a few giggles though.

  • Marsha
    2019-03-17 03:39

    I know this tale as one of a trickster getting a meal out of a grasping miser and a mysterious traveler bringing together a starving village grown tight fisted and mean because of a drought. There’s also one featuring hungry soldiers using nails and another with a beggar who utilizes buttons. So it was a treat to read yet another version about a superior uncle and the supposedly lazy boys who make a delicious soup using only stones.The story shows the sly boys turning the tables on the narrator, a man they call Uncle. You don’t know whether it’s in deference to his age or whether he’s their real uncle and it doesn’t matter. He thinks they are indolent, stupid and disrespectful. What they think of him remains unspoken but the illustrations display their wily, sidelong glances and hidden smirks as the boys get him to work for them by flattering him, being abrupt or seeming to take his advice. Clearly, they play a trick on the old man and he’s none the wiser.The illustrations are by Stéphane Jorisch. I remember his work from Jabberwocky in the Visions of Poetry series. Those illustrations were borderline bizarre, with angular nearly headless people who looked more like store mannequins set in a world of outsize television sets and bizarre trees and a vorpal sword that resembled a feather duster more than a weapon. Here the illustrations are more realistic. They show the Chang brothers in native dress, while their Uncle chops stout bamboos stalks into bowls as men punt their low fishing boats in the distance.Native language enhances the story as well as the clever illustrations and the book comes with a recipe at the end! So if you want to try your hand at this soup, read this book and keep your stones in your pocket.

  • Bridgette Elston
    2019-03-11 07:40

    definately for older children. the sarcasm may be lost on younger kids.

  • Chris
    2019-02-24 05:48

    Ditto

  • Amanda Hennen
    2019-03-02 23:51

    The Real Story of Stone Soup is about a lazy fisherman who puts all of the work on three young boys. The young boys make an elaborate soup using stones that the fisherman takes credit for. The fisherman believes that the soup is made only of stones and he did an excellent job.This is an example of a traditional book. The story contains contrasting images and text. This contrast makes the story more humorous for the reader. This story also contains a lesson on trickery and hard work. The cultural background of the story makes it educational for students to read. The students will learn about stone soup, which is a traditional dish in China.

  • Jessica Simmons
    2019-03-01 06:54

    This is similar to the original story of stone soup, but it is put into a different perspective. This story is set in China. I thought that this story kind of made fun of the original story and said some things that weren't very nice about the characters.

  • David
    2019-03-01 05:06

    The Real Story of Stone Soup by Ying Chang Compestine, illustrated by Stéphane Jorisch is a clever retelling of the classic tale, set in China and featuring a regional traditonal egg drop soup.A stingy, lazy fisherman always makes his three young helpers do all the work. After scolding the "lazy' boys for forgetting to provide lunch, they announce that they can make stone soup. The boys dig a hole and fill it with water and flavored stones. They trick the fisherman into making bowls and chopsticks, and fetching salt and sesame oil. While he's busy, they stir in bird eggs, add wild vegetables, and slip fish into the soup. By the time the old man returns, they have a feast fit for a king, which he thinks is made only of stones, and for which he takes full credit.This clever tale narrated by the lazy fisherman is very humourous. A Note From The Author begins this tale and gives background helpful in appreciating the story and the soup, which is a traditional dish in the Xi Shuang Ban Na area of southeast China. While the fisherman tells everyone about this soup, he has never "had time to make it" because he "works too hard already." The recipe and directions for Chang Brothers' Egg Drop Soup is given in the back of the book.The colorful illustrations in watercolor, gouache and pen-and-ink tell the real story, showing how the boys fool the fisherman into thinking that the stones are producing the delicious soup. Actually, the boys are secretly adding each ingredient while the fisherman is busy making chopsticks and bowls, and bringing sesame oil and salt from the boat. Readers and listeners must look carefully at the many details in the drawings to realize what is really happening and how the boys are tricking the fisherman. The observant monkeys add additional humor.I really enjoy this version. While it could make an interesting read-aloud, it may be more effective when read and studied one on one so that the detailed illustrations may be deciphered. It could also be compared to other versions of this folktale.For ages 4 to 7, folktales, China, soup, Chang brothers, tricksters, cooking, and fans of Ying Chang Compestine and Stéphane Jorisch.

  • Melissa Talley
    2019-02-25 07:45

    Fractured fairy taleThis is a Chinese version of stone soup where two brothers are hired to go out on a boat to help catch fish. After getting hungry for lunch they dock the boat and decide to make soup. Only to discover that the dumb brothers as they are referred to in the story have forgotten the pan. One of the brothers quickly discovers that they can dig a hole in the sand and line it with banana leaves to cook in. This is a delightful story about using your resources and being thrifty. At the end of the book there is a recipe for egg drop stone soup.

  • Jan
    2019-02-21 01:55

    Some old folktales can be found in varying forms around the world. Stone Soup is one of those folktales that has been retold in many ways and many places. This particular version takes place in China, with an amusing contraposition between the story told by the narrator and the story told by the pictures. The narrator is a fisherman who says he works constantly. But the pictures show the fisherman asleep while his boys (the ones he calls lazy!) labor all day, hauling in heavy nets of fish. The western versions of Stone Soup have other people contributing ingredients to the soup, but in this version, the boys add all the ingredients, and fool the fisherman into thinking that he himself made the soup with stones.Reading this particular book aloud would be incomplete without examining the pictures and discovering the rest of the story. Preschoolers may not get the humor of the contrast between the words and pictures without someone pointing it out. Placing the story in China gives a different flavor to the soup as well as to the story. Good for a classroom unit on folklore.Stephane Jorisch's delightful pen-and-ink, gouache, and watercolor illustrations add amusing and important information to the story. Ages 5-12.

  • Sivyu
    2019-03-01 23:44

    Ying Chang Compestine. The Real Story of Stone Soup (2007). The motif the three round smooth stones and stone soup runs through many cultures. In this version, long ago in China a lazy fisherman called Uncle hires the 3 Chang brothers to help me on his fishing boat. One day the brothers forget the cooking pot and improvise by cooking soup in a hole in the ground lined with leaves. They set Uncle off doing tasks while they make a soup with three round stones. Each time they put in a stone, they say a magic word and blow on it three times. What Uncle doesn't see is that they are adding ingredients behind his back, but the reader sees! It has very whimsical watercolor illustrations. This version is a nice twist on the folktale. This would be an especially good book for reading aloud. It would be a good for a unit on Stone Soup, cooking, or China. It also includes a recipe for the Chang Brothers' Egg Drop Stone Soup. Target audience: 4 - 8 years.

  • Shannon Stinnette
    2019-02-26 03:55

    This story is a variant folktale from the folktale many of us have heard, Stone Soup. This story is the Chinese version. It contains some of the same elements of trickery from the original version as well as the fact that soup is being made with stones. This version is different as the narrator is the one who is being tricked. The narrator in the story employs the Chang brothers to do work for him. He calls the boys lazy, but cheap labor. One afternoon while fishing they decide to dock their boat for lunch. Since a cooking pot wasn't available, they decided to dig a hole in the sand and line it with banana leaves for a pot of soup. The narrator makes soup bowls and chop sticks out of bamboo and is irritated that he has done all of the work and the Chang brothers have only added stones to the soup. Through clever illustrations along each page we see that the Chang brothers have in reality added all of the ingredients to the soup! This adds humor to the story and quite comical that the narrator really believes that the soup is made from stones alone.

  • Robert Phillips
    2019-02-22 00:05

    This book is about a fisherman who has three young boys do all his work for him. One day the fisherman said he was hungry and the boys said they would make "stone soup" for him. The kids say the stones are flavored and put them into a hole of water. The fisherman returns with other ingrediants and the stone soup is complete. This story is good to read in the classroom because "stone soup" is actually a dish in China and im sure no students in northern Minnesota would ever think this is real. This helps show the students cultural difference and how one country might have completely different foods then another.

  • Vanessa
    2019-02-23 03:01

    stingy fisherman always makes his three young helpers do all his work. One day he scolds the “lazy boys” for forgetting to provide lunch. “Don’t worry,” they say. “We can make stone soup.” The boys dig a hole and fill it with water and “flavored” stones. They trick the fisherman into making bowls and chopsticks, and fetching salt and sesame oil. While he’s busy, they stir in bird eggs, add wild vegetables, and slip fish into the soup. By the time the old man returns, they have a feast fit for a king. To this day, “Egg Drop Stone Soup” is a traditional dish in southeast China. A recipe is included was pretty cool at the end of the book.

  • Courtney
    2019-03-06 00:05

    I remember reading this Chinese folk tale when I was little. This story starts when a fisherman hires three brothers to work for him that he claims are lazy and don't want to work. One day they decide to dock the boat to eat lunch when they discover that they forgot the cooking pot and ingredients to make lunch. The three boys end up digging a hole in the sand for a pot and gathering nearby resources to prepare a meal. It ends up being the best stone soup they have ever had, even their uncles agrees. This book is entertaining from the contrast between the text and illustrations.

  • Karina Espinales
    2019-02-17 07:06

    This is a folktale from the China subgroup. Only the English language is used throughout the book. The book is about an elderly man and his three helper boys who work together to make stone soup. The children can relate to the story because they sometimes help out their parents do the chores around the house. The story also teaches teamwork and how the children are supposed to respect their elders.

  • Michelle
    2019-03-02 06:38

    The illustrations hold so much of the story, with great humor and detail--they make the book. The narrative voice is so off-putting at first I didn't know if I was going to be able to keep reading. I especially thought the name-calling unnecessary, and edited it out when reading aloud to my kids. But I really like the example of an unreliable narrator for kids, and also the new information about the origin of stone soup.

  • Jamie
    2019-02-25 07:52

    This story is the about how stone soup was first created not the old folktale. 'Uncle' hires the Chang brothers to help him on his fishing boat. They are nice boys, but very lazy. Uncle and the Chang brothers head to shore to dock the boat for lunch. Uncle asks the boys to grab the pot to make the soup. The brothers tell him the pot was forgotten. The brothers make the 'stone' soup. After the making of the soup Uncle shares with his friends on how he invented the real stone soup.

  • The Styling Librarian
    2019-03-01 05:46

    The Real Story of Stone Soup by Ying Chang Compestine, illustrated by Stephane Jorisch – Folktale – I’m ridiculously excited to have Ying Chang Compestine visit Bradbury in a few weeks, her books are just fantastic. Loved reading this lovely twist to the stone soup story, especially since it was based off of true origins in China. Additionally, it is a wonderful read aloud. Next I’m reading her new novel, Secrets of the Terra-Cotta Soldier that she wrote with her son.

  • Carol
    2019-03-14 03:41

    Filled with verbal irony, this Chinese folktale creates as much or even more humor that Marcia Brown's "Stone Soup." An egotistical fisherman who employs three young "lazy" boys is thrilled with the stone soup that they cook. Of course, he ends up supplying most of the ingredients. The result is the most delicious egg drop soup ever made. This book includes a real recipe.

  • Christina Bergstrom
    2019-02-21 00:54

    This was a very creative version of an old story. Who knows, maybe the Chinese legend is the real version of this story. The text is humorous and the illustrations give character to the text. As far as teaching goes, I believe that I would use this story to show that even with history, there are different versions of the same incidents.

  • Michael
    2019-02-20 23:43

    Stone Soup is to storytelling what "Misty" is to Jazz, most tellers have their own version, and you better bring something new to the table if you want to be remembered. (You can see my version in my book "Connecting Boys With Books" from ALA Editions)

  • Magila
    2019-03-11 04:47

    3.5I wanted to love this more than I did. The story was fun. Hearing the "real" story of stone soup was interesting. The little recipe at the book's end was a nice touch. With so many picture books out there, this is a renter but I would probably not recommend buying it. The art was good.

  • Kevin
    2019-03-08 05:47

    I loved this story. I remember the classic tale of Stone Soup from childhood. I love the message it teaches. This tale adds a new spin with lots of humor. Love the illustrations. I think the kids will love this story.

  • Paul
    2019-03-02 07:38

    This is a great inversion of the stone soup story we're used to. The three workers and lazy master, the story elements, the drawings all blend well. And there is a recipe at the back of the book to make the book a whole experience.